Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll

Each year, the Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll formally acknowledges and celebrates the wide-ranging achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Victorians.

The name of the Honour Roll has now been changed to the Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll. The change of name reflects advice received by the Office of Aboriginal Affairs Victoria that the Victorian Aboriginal community prefers the use of the term 'Aboriginal' rather than 'Indigenous'. The term 'Aboriginal' is used here to refer to both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Watch the 2015 ceremony

About the Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll

Established in 2011, the annual Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll is the first of its kind in Australia.
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Nominations

Nominate an Aboriginal Victorian who has made, or is making, a lasting contribution to society.
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Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll 2015 inductees

Read the biographies of the well-known figures and quiet achievers inducted into the Honour Roll in 2015.
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Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll 2014 inductees

Read the biographies of the well-known figures and quiet achievers inducted into the Honour Roll in 2014.
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Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll 2013 inductees

Read the biographies of the well-known figures and quiet achievers inducted into the Honour Roll in 2013. 
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Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll 2012 inductees

Read the biographies of the well-known figures and quiet achievers inducted into the Honour Roll in 2012.
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Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll 2011 inductees

Read the biographies of the well-known figures and quiet achievers inducted into the Honour Roll in 2011.
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The artwork associated with the Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll

The artwork associated with the Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll was created by Mick Harding. 

Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll

GARIILIN BA WARRAWARRAN BIIK – NYANYIN

The Blues and Greens of our Country

"The range of green leaves represent the diversity of traditional owners throughout Victoria and the shield that floats inside them represents the resilience of our people over thousands of generations that we have been here.

The concentrated line work represents our unique symbolism that we use to explain our connection to country here in Victoria. The wavy blue lines represent the ocean and inland waterways that surround and run through Victoria. The subtle arcs that run through the water bodies represent the importance of water and our relationship and responsibility to it."

Our Culture, Your Culture
Mick Harding

 

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Last updated on Friday, 20 November 2015